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Archive for the ‘wild swimming’ Category

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China Daily reports: Di Huanran …the 60-year-old daredevil is the resident waterfall diver at the northeast border city’s Jingpo Lake resort, and he loves his job of providing hair-raising entertainment for sightseers.

“I feel I’m flying like a hawk and this feeling is such a great joy,” enthused the pensioner in a recent interview with Xinhua. “When I am in the air, I wish time would stand still. Every time I try a new height or a new place, it’s a breath of fresh air.”

Upon reaching retirement age last winter, Di was devastated to learn his contract would not be renewed. The bombshell even affected his health and he fell ill.

Things took a turn for the better a month later, though, when he signed a contract extension allowing him to earn at least 180,000 yuan (nearly $30,000) per year in addition to his pension. More importantly, he could resume diving down the 20-meter Diaoshuilou Waterfall – the world’s largest basalt cascade – every day.

Over the years, Di has tried diving off almost every bridge in Heilongjiang province, including the Mudan River Bridge and the Songhua River Bridge in Harbin.

Some of his favorite spots include the Hukou Waterfall on the upstream of the Yellow River and the Haihe Jiefang Bridge in Tianjin.

Despite the risk involved, Di insists safety is always uppermost in his thoughts.

“You need to be a good swimmer and you need to know how to adjust your body to avoid going too deep,” he explained.

“A depth of one and a half meters is fine for me, so I can return to the surface quickly and don’t get lost in the turbulence.

“Diving down, you need to prevent your body from heading to the bottom, and you need to make sure you are able to swim back to the bank, that’s what I keep in mind for each attempt.”

In 2008, Di was awarded a Guinness World Record as the globe’s highest waterfall diver. But he remains uneasy with the daredevil tag he has earned.

“I will only dive down when I’m 100 percent sure I’m not risking my life. Safety is always my top priority when I try this activity, which to many is so risky. I like to think of myself as an explorer as opposed to an adventurer.”

Remarkably, Di hopes to continue his adventures for another two decades.

“Outdoor diving is a huge part of my life,” he said. “As long as my body condition allows, I think I will continue diving until the age of 80.” Compare attitudes in China with the UKRead more or Watch the video below:

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The Ilkley Gazette reports: ILKLEY Clean River Campaign is applying for the River Wharfe to be designated for swimming in a bid to rid it of pollution.

Ilkley would be the first in the UK to achieve this status if it can be proved that the public plays, paddles and swims in the river.

Becky Malby, of the campaign group said: “We are applying for Designated Bathing Water status between the Old Bridge and Denton Bridge to cover the entire area where locals and tourists enjoy the river. This would put pressure on the water agencies to ensure they are not polluting the river with raw sewage, and would make our river fit to paddle and play in.

“To prove that we need a clean river we are required to count people on the river bank and playing in the river over the period May 15 to September 30.

“To do this we need to photograph (long shot not close up) and count people in the river at least 20 times over the summer. We need to count the number of adults and children separately, and state the numbers related to swimming, paddling, playing (inflatables), and on the riverbank. We are looking for volunteers to help us with the counting. We provide you with a Ilkley Clean River Group t-shirt, clicker, form and information flyers (as people are bound to ask what you are up too). You volunteer to do two or more counts in one week (choose your week) between May and September. You count when there are a lot of people there!

“We will present the interim results at a Town Meeting on the 11th July and also update everyone on the results of the Citizen Water Testing. If you have comments on the Designated Bathing Water Status, or can volunteer for counting please let us know on our website https://sites.google.com/view/cleanwharfeilkley/home?authuser=0

or Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/Ilkley-Clean-River-Group-431201944302819/

Ilkley Clean River Group’s second Ilkley Town Meeting is on July 11 from 5.30pm – 7pm in Christchurch.

Data from the citizen testing and the bathing count will be shared and MP John Grogan will be there along with new Town Mayor, Mark Stidworthy.

Becky added: “Do come and hear our progress and contribute your thoughts to the campaign and contribute to the consultation on Bathing Water Status.”

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Teenager Cleans up River for her Brother

News Canada reports: In 2015, 11-year-old Stella Bowles wanted to go swimming in LaHave River in Nova Scotia, but her mom said no. Stella’s mom told her it wasn’t a good idea because of the sewage that was being dumped into the river. This prompted Stella to begin testing the river water for fecal bacteria as part of a science project. She sampled parts of the river where her brother went swimming and, with the help of a local doctor, the samples were tested for bacteria.

The results discovered that the four areas that were sampled had bacteria levels that exceeded Health Canada guidelines.

Stella began to research the impact straight pipes had on the health of the river. A straight pipe system is a sewage disposal system that transports raw or partially settled sewage directly into the water. The discharge of raw sewage into the LaHave River through straight pipes is illegal under the Nova Scotia. She posted her findings on a Facebook page that garnered hundreds of shares and responses.

Stella ended up securing more than $15-million from all three levels of government to fix the problem. In 2018, work to swap out straight pupes for septic systems that include septic tanks, pump chamber, sand filters and drain fields began. More…

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Swim City Exhibition Basel Switzerland

25.05. – 29.09.2019

Swim City

Opening: 24/05/2019, 7 PM

The exhibition “Swim Citywill be the first to draw attention to one particular contemporary phenomenon in the urban space: river swimming as a mass movement – a 21st-century Swiss invention. For decades, cities like Basel, Bern, Zurich and Geneva have been gradually making the river accessible as a natural public resource in the built environment. This has made the river become a place of leisure, right on the doorstep and firmly anchored in everyday life. The rest of the world looks on in awe at the bathing culture in the Rhine, Aare, Limmat and Rhone. Here, cities like Paris, Berlin, London and New York see an example of how they can reclaim their river areas as a spatial resource, so as to sustainably improve the quality of people’s urban lives.

Curators:  Barbara Buser, Architect and Rhine expert; Andreas Ruby, Director S AM
For the film recordings, S AM collaborates with Zurich director Jürg Egli, who creates a large-scale triple-screen projection that will show the experience of river swimming from the perspective of the swimmer.

Discover more…

Basel Swim City

Watch the Video              Discover Wild Swimming in Switzerland

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Glasgow Live reports: We chart the evolution of swimming from the River Clyde to the public and private baths that sprung up across the city.

In the 18th century, long before the appearance of swimming baths in the city, swimming as a leisure pursuit was practiced by plenty of Glaswegians in the most obvious place – the River Clyde.

Its popularity among the working classes was down to the easy access afforded to the river, alongside the obvious fact that is was both an activity without cost and killed two birds with one stone in that it was both refreshing and a way to ensure personal cleanliness.

Another reason for success of informal river swimming in the city was the formation of the Glasgow Humane Society in 1790 (the oldest continuing lifeboat service in the UK) – which helped to bring down the number of drownings that were occurring.

The construction of a boat house and a room with life saving equipment reduced the risks involved in taking to the Clyde along with it, as well as the introduction of a life saving officer working out of the boat house and rewards for people who helped people who had gotten into difficulty on the river.

But with fatalities continuing the Council decided to take it upon themselves to build facilities at the river to try and ensure people would bathe at the same (safe)  location.

Not that it mattered much post 1850 – as the increase in river traffic and the move by industries to secure locations next to the Clyde, alongside the polluting of the river, practically put a halt to the popular Glasgow pasttime.

While the Council also passed a law prohibiting river bathing in certain (dangerous) areas and used local police to strictly enforce a rule limiting the amount of flesh you could display as you took a dip.

Things began to change with the opening of an opening air facility in Alexandra park in Dennistoun in 1877 form the summer months and an increase in national (and local) concern for general public health.

Prior to that, one of the first indoor swimming and bathing facilities for the public to use was situated up in the Blythswood area from which Bath Street gets its name.

Constructed by businessman William Harley (who made his money in the cotton trade), the lavish setup and social facilities attempted to attract the upper echelons of Glasgow society.

But it struggled to do so in a time where physical exercise wasn’t regarded as necessary (especially in a 12 hour, six day a week industrial working day) and where few people could swim – coupled with the hard fact that Glaswegians loved a ‘bevvy’ and a bet couldn’t do either in the confines of the swimming pool.

But with renewed interest in swimming in the 1870s into the 20th century, ten indoor swimming pools were constructed in the city (five public and five private), such as North Woodside Pool in 1882 – the oldest public pool in operation today.

Private baths such as the still-standing Arlington Baths proved popular given that the upper levels of society had begun to enjoy making trips to seaside resorts outside of the city on the West Coast and the fact that they offered swimming lessons to members.

Figures show that in 1900, male Glaswegians made 475,000 trips to public swimming pools, with that figure rising to over 700,000 by 1914. Compare that to 30,000 females visiting public baths in 1900 increasing to 100,000 in 1914.

A by-product of the increase in swimming was the rise in popularity in Glasgow of competitive swimming both in participating and as a spectator. With clubs springing up across the city – numbering 109 in 1914.

Cut to today and with Glaswegians more keen on staying fit and active than ever before, we remain pretty much spoilt for choice with 12 public swimming pools to choose from at sites such as Scotstoun, The Gorbals, Tollcross and Maryhill, as well as a handful of private baths.

Enough to ensure both that, like in years gone by, residents are never too far away from their nearest pool and that our love affair with going for a wee dip remains as strong as ever – although doing so in the River Clyde is well and truly a thing of the past!

Discover swimming history in your region…

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BBC News Reports: Researchers are testing the water in Cambridge to identify the source of bacterial infections affecting rowers and swimmers.

Puntseq’s survey of regular river users found that one in five “obtained an infection likely attributed to Cam water contact”.

Symptoms included so-called “swimmer’s itch”, fever after swallowing water, and wound infections.

In 2014, organisers cancelled the first City of Cambridge Triathlon after the river tested positive for potentially-fatal Weil’s disease.

The team collected water samples at nine points along the river, between Grantchester Meadows and Baits Bite Lock, at three different times last year – in April, June and August.

After samples are filtered and processed, they use a tiny portable sequencing device, called a MinION, to pinpoint and identify the DNA profile of any lurking bugs.

PhD student Lara Urban, of the European Bioinformatics Institute, said the team had “an important societal question to answer”.

She said: “People here are very divided: some will just go swimming everywhere; others say they wouldn’t even put their hand in the river.

“We have not found anything ‘super dangerous’, but we may have one candidate that is known to cause wound infections and come from agricultural input”.

Tom Larnach, river manager with the River Cam Conservancy, welcomed the study.

“The river attracts so many people because it has so many facets – the tradition of punting, the beauty of the colleges – and the fact that 10 minutes along the towpath you’re in pristine countryside,” he said.

“Anything that helps build up a bigger picture of the overall health of the river is a good thing.”

Puntseq’s findings will be published in the summer. ​

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Discover the history of swimming in Cambridge…

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Edinburgh Live reports: Feeling fresh this morning? Well, you probably weren’t as as invigorated as the 69 women who ran into the sea at Wardie Bay in Edinburgh for a sunrise wild swim in honour of International Women’s Day.

With the sea at a brisk 5.5 degrees, they gathered in wetsuits and swimsuits to celebrate their own bodies and those of women everywhere – sharing their message of solidarity and body positivity.

Organised by activist Danni Gordon of The Chachi Power Project and photographer Anna Deacon of the Wild Swimming Photography Project, the event drew swimmers from all across the Scottish Central Belt, Fife, East and West Lothian.

They were inspired by the joy of wild swimming, but also by the intense and sometimes heart-breaking stories people told to explain why they had decided to take it up – among these stories were a number related to body confidence. Read more…

Discover how changing attitudes towards the body forced swimmers out of open water and into the chlorinated confinement of the swimming pool.

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