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Archive for the ‘wild swimming’ Category

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Leicestershire Live reports: A ‘world class’ water sports park could open in the East Midlands in a matter of months.

Plans to replace a former gravel pit south of the Attenborough Nature Centre in Long Eaton with a water sports facility were approved by Erewash Borough Council on January 23.

Due to approval being granted, the park could open as soon as this summer.

Councillors have claimed the 133-acre former Trent Meadow gravel pit, off Pasture Lane, is currently the site of fly-tipping, antisocial behaviour, fires and trespassers. They felt putting it to a use which benefited the wider community was a welcome proposal that “could not come soon enough”.

The application was put forward by Richard and Katie Hill, of Mansfield.

It would see the site renamed as the Spring Lakes Watersports Club, and feature wakeboarding, ramps, canoeing, kayaking, paddle-boarding, rowing boats, pedalos, scuba diving, raft building, open water swimming, a floating inflatable aqua park and a play area.

Two wakeboarding cables would be installed as part of the plans, to tow riders along and over the ramps, with separate courses for advanced and inexperienced riders.

Several new buildings would be on stilts beside the lake, bringing them to a maximum height of nine metres, to avoid flooding issues.

These buildings would include changing areas, showers, toilets, three classrooms, a shop, kitchen, cafe and an outdoor viewing platform overlooking the lake.

He said as chairman of the Church Wilne Water Sports Club in Draycott for the past three to four years, teaching kids aged four to 16, he knew there was a demand for such a centre.

Mr Hill said: “Over the years I have seen the impact this (taking part in water sports) can have on their confidence, their sense of team spirit and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

“But many of the young people who turn up can’t afford to ride in the boats – it is around £45 for 15 minutes on average.

“On a daily basis I was forced to turn young people away because they could not afford it.

“The fact people in Nottingham, Leicester and Derby have no access to water sports frankly is not acceptable to us.

“Our aim is to be able to offer these sports to the whole community, especially people who would not usually have access.

“We can offer not just high intensity sport here but also pedalos and raft-building.

“The possibility here for a fun family day out is endless.” More…

 

 

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Sky News reports: The plans include a 25-metre swimming pool, children’s splash area, pavilion and cafe for the public. Water will be naturally treated and heated with alternative energy sources.

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But the original features of the Grade II listed Georgian building will be maintained, including its crescent shape, which mimics the city’s renowned architecture.

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The baths first opened in 1815 after the Bathwick Water Act, which banned nude bathing in the city’s river.

It closed in 1984 and had a brief second life as a trout farm but has fallen into disrepair. It’s been maintained by volunteers and more than £800,000 has been raised to help the renovation work.

Discover the history of British swimming just £11.11 inc P&P today only…

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The Telegraph reports: From an Edwardian swimming sensation to the women who built Waterloo Bridge, fine-art photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten is recreating some of the most dramatic episodes of the Thames’ past.

Since she took the first picture for her ongoing series Old Father Thames, Fullerton-Batten, now 48, has raked the entire length of the river – 215 miles from its source in the Cotswolds to its marshy mouth near Sheerness and Southend – for 18 images, so far, recreating ‘true but extraordinary stories’.

The time in 1814, for instance, when, during a frost fair, an elephant was led across the frozen river alongside Blackfriars Bridge. Or the vaudeville actress who swam from Putney to Blackwall (a distance of 17 miles) in 1905, wearing a bathing suit she had improvised from a pair of tights and a men’s swimsuit (it was that, more than her athletic feat, which grabbed the headlines and two years later she was arrested for wearing it in Boston, on grounds of indecency). More…

Discover where we used to swim in London: Indoors Outdoors

 

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ITV.com Reports: The 33-year-old was joined for the final kilometre of his 1,791-mile, 157-day Great British Swim around the mainland by 400 fellow swimmers in Margate on Sunday.

Edgley left the Kent town on June 1, swimming in a clockwise direction, and his arrival on the beach at 8.40am was his first time on dry land since then.

Swimming up to 12 hours a day, including through the night, he has battled strong tides and currents in cold water, storms, jellyfish and swimming into the chilly autumn.

His efforts have taken their toll on his body, including shoulder pain and wetsuit chafing, plus salt water exposure.

Edgley’s odyssey was compared from the outset to the feat of Captain Matthew Webb, who in 1875 became the first person to swim the English Channel.

But, while more than 1,900 swimmers have since made the crossing, few are likely to follow in Edgley’s wake. Fifty-seven of the swimmers who joined him on Sunday morning have swum the Channel.

Edgley was accompanied by Cornish sailor Matthew Knight, supporting from his catamaran Hecate.

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The Derry Journal Reports: A ban on swimming at Portmore Pier in Malin Head has been met with anger and calls for it to be lifted.

A sign was recently erected at the pier by Donegal County Council, which warns users of the slipway and slippery surface and issues a warning that states: ‘No Swimming.’

Portmore (Port Mor) Pier is a popular destination for both locals and holiday makers, many from Derry, who regularly swim there, particularly during the summer months.

Swimming lessons for children have also been taking place there for almost 50 years.

Ali Farren, who is from Malin Head and owns Ardmalin Caravan Park, questioned the council’s decision and lack of public consultation.

Mr Farren said people are aware of the dangers of swimming, but did not agree with an all-out ban at Malin Head pier.

He said: “A sign saying: ‘Swim at your own risk,’ would be enough. We’ve had people learning to swim here for generations. Irish Water Safety held their week here during the summer and Splash Swimming put on two extra weeks of lessons. But what insurance company is going to cover anyone now to provide swimming lessons there? I recommend to so many people that they go and swim at the pier. I can’t do that now without making myself liable. The pier is a tourism provider, locally. It’s our water park and it’s the hub of our community.”

Mr Farren pointed out how Malin Head is a “marine community.”

He said: “We depend on our young people learning to swim and to be safe. Our nearest public pools are in Derry and Letterkenny.”

In response to the ban, Donegal County Council said: “Portmore pier is one of the busiest piers in the control of Donegal County Council in terms of fishing activity. We are trying to indicate and inform the public of all the hazards they are likely to encounter at the piers. Portmore pier is not a suitable location for swimming simply due to the movement of fishing boats along the pier and that is why the sign indicates “no swimming” This refers to the pier only and not surrounding area.” Read more on this story…

See also: Could Health and Safety be Drowning Us by Accident?

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Discover attitudes in Switzerland

 

 

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Soapbox Media reports: Only those who have crossed the Ohio River — from Cincinnati to Kentucky and back — truly understand the allure of the Bill Keating, Jr. Great Ohio River Swim.

The Ohio River swimmers jump in the water at the upper end of the serpentine wall, swim across the river to Newport, then back to the boat ramp at the public landing. Total distance is approximately one half mile (or about 40 lengths in a swimming pool).

Prior to the swim, the river is closed to all motorized traffic by the U.S. Coast Guard and is enforced by local and regional law enforcement agency vessels. Flotillas of safety kayakers line the course to assist swimmers if necessary.

The velocity of the river is usually very slow this time of year, less than one mph, and the V-shaped course allows for swimmers’ downstream “drift” due to the current. Water quality is monitored prior to the event to assure safe conditions for all swimmers. The water temperature is usually in the low- to mid-80s, warm enough so that wet suits are not necessary.

Initially, the main reason behind The Swim was to demonstrate to the public that the Ohio is cleaner and safer than most people think, and to encourage participants and the general public to value and advocate for our river.

“It was always a family event,” she says, “and I could never get out of it. I cannot wait until my niece and nephews are old enough to do the Next Generation swim, maybe next summer.” More…

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Culture clash! Click the image below and see for yourself the contrast between British and Swiss culture when it comes to outdoor swimming.

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