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Archive for the ‘swimming pool’ Category

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The Mail online reports: Don’t go swimming while wearing sunscreen – unless you want cancer.

A compound used in the protective lotions turns toxic when it reacts with chlorine and ultraviolet rays, researchers found.

Avobenzone is considered the most popular sun-blocker in the world due to its ability to absorb sunlight at different wave lengths – preventing skin damage.

But Russian scientists suggest the UV-filtering compound forms cancer-causing toxins when exposed to a mixture of sun and chlorinated water.

Aldehydes, phenols and chlorinated acetyl benzenes were created in experiments simulating swimmers wearing sunscreen.

The latter two are considered extremely toxic and are strongly linked to deadly tumours and infertility, Lomonosov Moscow State University experts say.

While a study earlier this year hinted that aldehydes can raise the risk of cancer as they interfere with the body’s natural repair mechanism.

SUNSCREEN COULD MAKE MEN INFERTILE

Sunscreen can render a man infertile by disrupting human sperm cells, a Danish study found last April.

Nearly half of the ingredients commonly used to block out ultra-violet light mimic the effects of the female hormone progesterone.

This stops sperm cells functioning normally, researchers said at the time.

The sunscreen lotion can enter the blood stream by being absorbed through the skin.

Niels Skakkebaek, a professor at the University of Copenhagen said the findings were worrying.

‘These results are of concern and might explain in part why unexplained infertility is so prevalent,’ he said.

 

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The Guardian reports: In 1936, Sir Josiah Stamp, then Governor of the Bank of England, made a speech at the opening of the Morecambe open air baths. “When we get down to swimming” he said, “we get down to democracy.” That sense of importance was not misplaced. Some 80 years later, on a brilliant blue, baking hot Saturday, similar grand emotions were evoked, at the re-opening of Saltdean Lido.

Five miles east of Brighton, Saltdean is a coastal village with the lido sitting proudly right on the seafront. Built in the 1930s, the pool was a glamorous part of the Saltdean “offer”, its main building curved like a cruise liner. The story of it shutting is a familiar one to lido historians, full of benign neglect. The space was measured up by developers, but the community’s eyes were still on it. “As a keen swimmer, architectural heritage lover and local resident there was no way I was going to lose [it] to flats” said Rebecca Crook, director and cofounder of Saltdean Lido Community Interest Company. The company fought to get control of the pool, and won. And after seven years, thousands of dedicated volunteer hours and the raising of £3m, here we are. A sparkling main pool restored to its original 40-metre length, refurbished surroundings and a paddling pool. It felt absolutely ace to be there.

The restoration of Saltdean is part of a wider story – public interest in open-air swimming has boomed in the last decade or so. Jubilee Pool in Penzance reopened last year; Charlton Lido in south-east London has extended its opening hours; there are campaigns to restore lidos to Bath, Peckham and Reading; and to build a new one in the middle of the Thames in central London. These are exciting times for lido lovers, those who want to be outside but don’t have access to wild swimming locations. Who appreciate the actual value of sun on skin. Who want somewhere to learn, or practice, or make community. Who recognise these places, still, as classless and timeless, where status is irrelevant because no amount of cash will buy you a better swim. Those of us in cities and towns who just want a moment’s escape from air con or inside. more…

Discover the history of swimming in England

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The Local FR reports: It’s official. The water in the Paris canal is clean enough to swim in meaning Parisians won’t have an excuse not to take a dip this summer.

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has promised Parisians they will be able to swim in the city’s canal this summer after test results revealed the water is clean enough for health standards.
Paris authorities had already voted to allow free swimming in the Bassin de la Villette which links the Canal St Martin and the Canal de l’Ourq in the north east of the city and is one of the locations for the Paris Plages summer beach festival.
But the green light depended on whether the water was clean enough.
The results are in and it’s good news for the city’s swimmers, many of whom took a dip in the canal for a one-off “open day” last summer (see photo above).
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The temporary structures will be built into the actual Bassin, which connects the Canal de l’Ourcq with the Canal Saint-Martin.
The smallest of the pools will be for children and just 40 centimetres deep. Another will be up to 120 centimetres in depth, while a third will be reserved for swimmers at 2m deep.
The pools in total will stretch 90 metres end to end and measure 16m across.
The City Hall estimates that around 1,000 people will show up to the pools on any given summer day.
It plans to take down the pools at the end of the summer period, with the hopes of setting them up again in the summer of 2018.
The Bassin de la Villette was inaugurated in 1808 by Napoleon Bonaparte and was a former port area during the industrialisation of rivers.
However these days it is the centre for numerous cultural events and has been well and truly gentriifed with numerous trendy bars and restaurants opening alongside the water.

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The Telegraph reports: The National Trust is to open its first public swimming pool after gardeners restoring a spectacular Victorian property stumbled across a long forgotten lido.

Groundsmen working at Standen House in West Sussex  – the former home of celebrated horticulturist Margaret Beale – discovered the neglected pond when they nearly fell into it while clearing undergrowth.

The lido was built in the 1890s for the wealthy Beale family and their seven children to enjoy a dip in the heart of their 12 acre garden. But it was long forgotten after being hidden beneath decades of growth. It would be the first time a man-made pool had been opened to the public at one of its properties.

Letters and diary entries by Mrs Beale, housed at Standen, reveal how the children spent happy summer in the pool. They would compete for the right to swim in the deep end by testing how long they could remain dunked underwater, and would dare one another to jump in rather than descend the steps. Read more…

 

 

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The River Torrens was home for the Gilberton Swimming Club until 1970 when it was banned from using the waterway

Adelaide Now reports:

A 100-year-old swimming club that started in the River Torrens is closing but only after sharing its $450,000 nest egg with the community. Gilberton Swimming Club will spread the money among the Walkerville, Klemzig, Vale Park and East Adelaide Primary schools. The $450,000 sum has grown from about $150,000 the state government paid the club when it was forced out of the Torrens swimming hole in 1970.

Gilberton Swimming Club on the banks of the River Torrens

A ban on swimming in the river displaced the club, which received the money for land it owned either side of the Torrens pool. The homeless club has since funded children’s swimming classes in local pools instead of building a replacement pool of its own. More…

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The Observer reports: Swimmers across Britain will greet the longest day by plunging into a pool tomorrow. Many will take that summer solstice dip amid the splendour of a restored public lido or municipal baths as the national appetite for preserving historic leisure facilities grows.

In Penzance, the Jubilee Pool reopened last month following a £3m repair project after storm damage in 2014. The pool, built in 1935, was first reopened in 1994 after falling into disrepair.

The new lido movement, driven by a fresh impulse to swim in the open air, has notched up a series of successful rescues. Among the star sites are south London’s Brockwell Lido, for years threatened with closure, the lido in High Wycombe, shut down in 2010, and one in Charlton, which reopened after a £2m refurbishment in 2013. In Reading, Berkshire, the team behind the restoration of Bristol’s chic Grade II-listed open-air pool at Clifton are doing extensive work on the former King’s Meadow pool, built in 1902 for women and initially fed by Thames water. It has been closed for 42 years. On the south coast, Saltdean Lido, near Brighton, was visited by communities and local government secretary Greg Clark this month to herald its restoration by 2017. Six years ago the pool was due to be filled in. More…

 

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The Age – Victoria reports: Fancy a swim in the Yarra River?

Watercraft regulations make it illegal and water quality makes it questionable – especially after it rains – but a not-for-profit group wants to change that by building a floating swimming pool on the river’s edge that would cost at least $6 million.

The Yarra Swim Co has released a concept design for the pool it suggests could be built on the banks of the Yarra next to Enterprize Park, where Melbourne’s settlers moored their ship in 1835.

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The concept was released on Thursday night as part of Australia’s Venice Biennale Exhibition, opening this week.

The group last year pushed to revive the historic Race to Princes Bridge, a swim competition that ran from the early 1900s to the 1960s, and again in the late 1980s.

It argues that waterway pools are a growing concept globally, with plans under way for New York and London. More…

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