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Archive for the ‘River Swimming’ Category

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Northamptonshire Telegraph reports: Swimmers hit by the closure of Kettering’s pool have started training in the River Nene because of a lack of water space.
It’s been closed since June 20, when a piece of paneling fell from the ceiling. With Wellingborough’s pool also closed for planned repairs and pool space elsewhere already booked, swimmers from Kettering took a novel approach to training last night (Wednesday) – by diving into the River Nene at Wadenhoe.

Kettering Swimming Club committee member Mike Annable said: “While open water swimming is popular among some of our members, the driver for this session is because we cannot find time in another pool to replace our Wednesday evening training sessions for three of our squads.”

The potential for a new pool in Kettering has been a talking point since it was first brought up at a council meeting in December.

Kettering Swimming Club does not recommend that people swim in rivers or lakes unless part of an organised event. More…

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Cambridge Independent reports: Wild swimming is a very popular sport – and one that has a long history in Cambridge.

Places for this year’s Swim the Cam sold out within days of being advertised on social media. That’s 50 people who will swim the 3.8km from Bryon’s Pool to Sheep’s Green at 11am on Saturday, July 15.

Cambridge Swim Through 1959

The event revives a competition which once attracted about 200 swimmers to the city’s river and could, like swims of the past, become an annual fixture.

“The response has been amazing,” says Jo Black, one of four volunteers organising Swim the Cam ‘17. “We’re hoping it will become a regular fixture in the open water swimming calendar.” More…

Did you know? Learning to swim in the river was once the norm for children in Cambridge. Discover more…

 

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250h0078a462a314a2d3b62bb4557169ba0fThe Westmeath Independent reports: A 57-year-old American who twice survived cancer is bidding to become the first person ever to swim the length of the River Shannon. Dean Hall set off on this remarkable challenge at the northern tip of Lough Allen on June 5.

“It is taxing, but I’ve found that with marathon swimming, as with cancer recovery and life, we are much more limitless than we would ever consider. “We put limits on ourselves mostly because of fear we have, or because of what other people tell us is our limit. Once we take those limits off ourselves, and let our bodies and our minds do what they were created to do, we can do nearly anything.

Along the way Dean is raising money for an Irish charity, the Childhood Cancer Foundation, which helps to fund services for children and families affected by childhood cancer. More…

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An item in the news from Switzerland warning swimmers that on Monday a boy of eight was bitten by a beaver whilst swimming in the Rhine at Lindli caught my eye. Later that day a woman was also bitten on the leg so badly she needed to go to hospital to have stitches.

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What advice have the authorities given? ” Beavers are only likely to become aggressive if they feel threatened or are defending their nest. Bathers are advised to avoid swimming close to the shore, and to not allow dogs to enter the water.”

What a contrast to the news this week and the tragic drownings resulting from river and lake swimming by those with little knowledge of how to stay safe.

Discover how differently the Swiss approach water safety.

 

 

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Cambridge News reports: Swimmers are being forced out of the River Cam after being “attacked” by parasitic mites that have spread rapidly in the water due to the warm weather.

The parasitic duck mite appears in the River Cam at this time of year and can cause a condition known as ‘swimmer’s itch’ (or cercarial dermatitis).

Ted Hunt is the treasurer of the Newnham Riverbank Club. He said the mites always appeared at this time of year. This year is worse than normal, he said, because of the heat.

“It is quite a well-documented thing,” said Mr Hunt. “It is also called swimmer’s itch. It happens every year. It is a little flat worm that has to find a duck to continue its life cycle. Unfortunately, if people are in the water, it goes to them as well.

“I have been swimming here for 40 years. This year, the river got warm quite quickly, and that has brought them on.”

Mr Hunt said there were practical things people could do to avoid being bitten, including getting a sun tan.

“If you give yourself a good rub down with a towel when you get out instead of drip drying, that seems to get rid of them,” he said. “There are two or three heads in the water right now. People are enjoying themselves. It tends to be people who are very pale they are attracted to, so getting a tan might help.

“In terms of aftercare, people could rub themselves over with aloe-vera. Hopefully, it will die down a bit in the next week.”

Discover the history of swimming in Cambridge

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swimmer1The Forest of Dean and Wye Valley Review reports: A RECORD 82 swimmers made a charity splash when they dived into the River Wye for an annual race.

The fourth Great Wye Swim organised by Monmouth School Sports Centre on Sunday, May 21, raised £1,370 for Mesothelioma UK and the St David’s Foundation.

Swimmers raced over 1km and 2km distances from Dixton Church, blessed by good weather and low water levels and cheered on by a large crowd.

The event was the brainchild of Teresa Tranter, an admin officer at the sports centre, who took part for the first time this year and won the non-wetsuit female class over 1km in 14 minutes 10 seconds.

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After enjoying the wonderful facilities open to outdoor swimmers around the world, swimmers here in the UK can’t help but feel disgruntled that their liberty to swim in rivers and lakes has for many years been denied, and especially so with the scorching weather we have just been enjoying this week.

We want to go dipping but the sign says NO SWIMMING!

The good news is that things are changing. The impossible is being achieved, albeit very slowly.

The problem lies in the fact that  authorities, keen to restrict swimming in open water (for reasons  long forgotten) have truly convinced themselves that wild swimming is just too risky. Its rather like Hans Christian Andersen’s The Emperor’s New Clothes, in that it takes a child to point out the obvious: “But he isn’t wearing anything at all!” The fact is plain to see, if swimming is OK throughout  Europe, how can it be more dangerous here?

This is not to say that its an easy thing for authorities to release their strangle hold on the swimmers freedom. If something goes wrong public opinion will want to point the finger of blame.

The good news comes from the Outdoor Swimming Society in the form of the: Inland Access Guide.

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Download a copy and its message of hope will prove better reading than the Sunday papers!

 

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