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Archive for the ‘Open Water Swimming’ Category

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Leicestershire Live reports: A ‘world class’ water sports park could open in the East Midlands in a matter of months.

Plans to replace a former gravel pit south of the Attenborough Nature Centre in Long Eaton with a water sports facility were approved by Erewash Borough Council on January 23.

Due to approval being granted, the park could open as soon as this summer.

Councillors have claimed the 133-acre former Trent Meadow gravel pit, off Pasture Lane, is currently the site of fly-tipping, antisocial behaviour, fires and trespassers. They felt putting it to a use which benefited the wider community was a welcome proposal that “could not come soon enough”.

The application was put forward by Richard and Katie Hill, of Mansfield.

It would see the site renamed as the Spring Lakes Watersports Club, and feature wakeboarding, ramps, canoeing, kayaking, paddle-boarding, rowing boats, pedalos, scuba diving, raft building, open water swimming, a floating inflatable aqua park and a play area.

Two wakeboarding cables would be installed as part of the plans, to tow riders along and over the ramps, with separate courses for advanced and inexperienced riders.

Several new buildings would be on stilts beside the lake, bringing them to a maximum height of nine metres, to avoid flooding issues.

These buildings would include changing areas, showers, toilets, three classrooms, a shop, kitchen, cafe and an outdoor viewing platform overlooking the lake.

He said as chairman of the Church Wilne Water Sports Club in Draycott for the past three to four years, teaching kids aged four to 16, he knew there was a demand for such a centre.

Mr Hill said: “Over the years I have seen the impact this (taking part in water sports) can have on their confidence, their sense of team spirit and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

“But many of the young people who turn up can’t afford to ride in the boats – it is around £45 for 15 minutes on average.

“On a daily basis I was forced to turn young people away because they could not afford it.

“The fact people in Nottingham, Leicester and Derby have no access to water sports frankly is not acceptable to us.

“Our aim is to be able to offer these sports to the whole community, especially people who would not usually have access.

“We can offer not just high intensity sport here but also pedalos and raft-building.

“The possibility here for a fun family day out is endless.” More…

 

 

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Culture clash! Click the image below and see for yourself the contrast between British and Swiss culture when it comes to outdoor swimming.

Wild Swimming Gunton Switzerland

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Readers Digest reports: There’s nothing like a good, old-fashioned swimming hole to beat the heat this summer. Here’s where to find the best spots all across the country.

Madison Blue Spring, Florida

This naturally-fed spring lives up to its name: The water is crystal blue and oh-so-inviting. Now a state park, the 25-foot deep swimming hole is located inside a lovely woodland next to the Withlacoochee River in northern Florida. If you’re brave, you can even cave dive into the hole’s underwater caverns.

Discover more…

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Artist's impression of the new lake

Lewisham’s largest green space, Beckenham Place Park, has been awarded £440,000 from Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London. The award is part of the mayor of London’s push to make London the world’s first National Park City.

The funding will be used to:

  • plant thousands of new trees
  • support the restoration of the park’s Georgian lake, which will create a new wildlife habitat and be used for open water swimming.

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Discover the history of British Swimming

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The National reports: Robert Hamilton’s dream of an open water regulator was torpedoed by near unanimous opposition from swimmers and swimming organisations, who said they were unwanted, unnecessary and overly commercial.

Unlike in England and Wales, where laws about open swimming are unclear, in Scotland, swimmers have a right to swim freely in open spaces.

Hamilton, along with commercial pilot Stewart Griffiths and swimmer Phia Steyn, had announced plans to establish the Scottish Open Water Swimming Association (SOWSA) to “promote and grow safe open water swimming within Scotland through co-operation between relevant stakeholders and partners in the country”.

Their proposal was to gather “open water swimmers, coaches, event organisers, boat pilots, health and safety professionals, landowners, local and national tourism bodies and relevant heritage and conservation bodies into one body with the aim of promoting and growing safe open water swimming in Scotland”.

But across the country, fans of outdoor aquatics were furious at what they saw as an attempt to limit access to lochs and water, potentially resulting in swimmers being forced to cough up cash for a dip.

There was opposition too from the British Long Distance Swimming Society (BLDSA) and the Outdoor Swimming Society (OSS),

In response to a consultation set up by Hamilton’s group, OSS said: “The establishment of a self-appointed regulatory body with power over all swimming events, venues and pilots in Scotland would create a commercial monopoly that would stifle, restrict and standardise the market, and restrict rather than improve swimming in Scotland.”

A joint response to the consultation from 28 different prominent swimmers complained they had not been made aware of the consultation, and were uncomfortable with a charity representing open water swimmers being proposed by “three people who are known to be closely involved in one of the most heavily advertised commercial companies running open water events and providing services to open water swimmers in Scotland”.

Discover why wild swimmers have faced restriction in England?

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The Otago Daily Times of New Zealand reports: More than 100 local children have been learning water survival skills and experiencing the reality of open water conditions under expert supervision.

The intensive week-long programme, a research project by Associate Prof Chris Button, Dean of the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise, is aimed at filling the gap in children’s open water survival skills.

In total, almost 120 children, mainly from Dunedin, have been learning about open water conditions and experiencing them ”in a fun and engaging way”.

Fifty-seven children aged between 7 and 11, undertook the programme earlier this month, another 60 taking part this week.

The free programme covers a variety of important topics such as float and control breathing, how to attract help in an emergency, underwater swimming to retrieve an object, fitting a life jacket appropriately, understanding river features such as currents, obstacles and unseen hazards, beach games, and awareness of appropriate behaviour in the event of a boat capsizing.

Yesterday’s sessions were at Otago Harbour where experienced Swimsation instructors from Moana Pool took the group through the theory of what they would be doing in the harbour before the children entered the water to put the theory into practice.

Today’s session will involve river survival skills at Outram Glen and tomorrow the group will be learn surf survival skills at Brighton Beach.

An assessment at the Taieri College Pool on Friday will be followed by another post-assessment in about three months.

The children’s knowledge and physical competency was assessed at the start of the programme.

Prof Button, whose interest is in motor learning, says children learn well and quickly and ”hopefully, they will retain what they learn on the programme”.

He said he developed the project because previously the focus had been on children learning to swim in swimming pools and he thought it would be better for them to learn how to swim and survive in open water, such as a harbour, a river and an ocean beach.

The programme was primarily a research project and the data would be provided to Water Safety New Zealand, Swimsation and other interested organisations.

 

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Bedfordshire on Sunday reports: Water safety signs erected at Bedford’s Great Ouse after three river deaths in two weeks.

MORE water safety signage have been erected following a series of river-deaths over the past month.

In recent weeks, three people have died in open water within Bedford Borough, including 39-year-old Zibigniew Lasocki who was pulled from the river on July 18.

Over the following two weeks officers pulled two more men from the river, the first on July 23 – in which the man was pulled from the river alive but later died in hospital – and the second on the morning of July 31

In light of the these tragic deaths, Bedford Borough Council, Bedfordshire Police and Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue are working together to ensure messages get out to the public on water safety.

Steven Allen, Homes, Roads & Leisure Safety Manager at Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue, said: “Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service urge the public to avoid swimming in open water for leisure and entering open water to help someone else thought to be in trouble. Cold water, strong currents and submerged hazards can quickly overwhelm the strongest of swimmers.

“The best way to help someone else in trouble is to immediately notify emergency services using 999, keep the person under observation and confirm their location to assist with rescue. Lifebelts or other flotation devices, where available, can be thrown to support a person in trouble until help arrives.” More…

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